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Adding Static Routes in Microsoft Office Encode Code 39 in Microsoft Office Adding Static Routes




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Adding Static Routes use none none printer tomake none on none iReport Static routes ar none for none e added manually to the workstation with the route command. The format of the route command is route add net net-address subnet-mask router hops, where net-address is the TCP/IP address for the entire network to be routed to; subnet-mask is the subnet mask for that network; router is the IP address of the router that routes to that network; and hops is the number of network hops to that network. Note UNIX and network administrators must work together when setting up routes on any workstation so that its routing configuration matches the actual network topology.

. Using the illust ration in Figure 9.3 as an example, the UNIX workstation on the right-hand side of the illustration would be set up as follows:. The file /etc/de none none faultrouter would contain the IP address of one of the two routers presumably the one leading to most other networks, in this case 10.14.48.

1. To add a route to the second network, the following command line is added to the end of the startup file /etc/rc2.d/S72inetsvc.

. route add net 10.15.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.14.48.2 1 This effectively none none tells the UNIX workstation, "To reach IP network 10.15.x.

x, send packets to router 10.14.48.

2 and, by the way, network 10.15.x.

x is one router hop away.". Adding Dynamic Routes An alternative t none for none o adding static routes with the route command is to run in.routed or in.rdisc.

Either of these routing daemons is started at boot time by adding the appropriate command line to /etc/rc2.d/S72inetsvc. The advantage of using one of these routing daemons is that the UNIX system need only listen on the network for routing information packets and use the information in those packets to dynamically update the system"s routing table.

In a frequently changing network, this can be a boon to UNIX and network administrators because the UNIX system need not be reconfigured with new static routes each time the network topology changes; instead new routing information will reach the UNIX system automatically. Warning There is always a dark side to configurations and methods designed to save time and increase efficiency, and dynamic routing is no exception. An intruder can easily forge packets containing false routing information and send them to a UNIX system known to listen to routing information packets.

This can be used to cause great harm to the organization that owns the system.. This is a book o n Solaris security, not general systems administration. Hence, discussions on how to set up dynamic routing will stop here. It should be enough for the UNIX administrator to know the pros and cons of static and dynamic routing and decide which is best for any particular environment.

Further, the UNIX-network interactions can be so complex in the realm of network topology and routing that I could write several chapters on this topic alone. Please refer to "Where to Go for Additional Information" at the end of this chapter for references to books which discuss this topic..

Using snoop snoop is a Solar is program used to listen to all packets on the network. It is important to know how to use snoop to diagnose a variety of network service problems. Here are several examples of ways to use snoop.

Note. snoop is a usefu none for none l diagnostic tool, but it is also potentially dangerous. Only the root user can run snoop . Since snoop can be used to capture session passwords and other sensitive data, (if for no other reason) the UNIX administrator must be careful about who has the root password on any UNIX system.

One suggestion might be to remove snoop from a UNIX system whose user has the root password.. 1. Show all packets passing to and from the machine linus. 2. 3. # snoop host linus 4. ... 5. 6. Show all packets on the network using the NTP protocol. 7. 8. # snoop port 123 9. ... 10. 11. Capture a te lnet session, including the login password. In this example, the userid is peterh, and the password is jeopardy.

. 12. 13. # snoop none none -v host lucy port 23 14.

Using device /dev/hme (promiscuous 15. linus -> lucy TELNET C 16. lucy -> linus TELNET R 17.

linus -> lucy TELNET C 18. lucy -> linus TELNET R 19. linus -> lucy TELNET C 20.

linus -> lucy TELNET C 21. lucy -> linus TELNET R 22. lucy -> linus TELNET R 23.

linus -> lucy TELNET C 24. lucy -> linus TELNET R 25. linus -> lucy TELNET C 26.

lucy -> linus TELNET R 27. linus -> lucy TELNET C 28. lucy -> linus TELNET R 29.

lucy -> linus TELNET R System V 30. linus -> lucy TELNET C 31. lucy -> linus TELNET R 32.

linus -> lucy TELNET C 33. lucy -> linus TELNET R 34. linus -> lucy TELNET C 35.

lucy -> linus TELNET R 36. linus -> lucy TELNET C 37. linus -> lucy TELNET C 38.

lucy -> linus TELNET R 39. linus -> lucy TELNET C 40. linus -> lucy TELNET C.

mode) port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 \r\n\r\nUNIX(r) port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459 port=42459.
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